Norton Online Family Report
Norton Online Family Report

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Summary: The Shocking Scale of Cybercrime

The Shocking Scale of Cybercrime

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$388
Billion

The total bill for cybercrime footed by online adults in 24 countries topped USD $388bn over the past year +

Victims valued the time they lost to cyber­crime at over $274bn
$114bn

The direct cash costs of cybercrime - money stolen by cyberthugs/spent on resolving cyberattacks - totalled $114bn

Cybercrime is bigger than...


…the global black market in marijuana, cocaine and heroin combined ($288bn) and approaching the value of all global drug trafficking ($411bn) i

At $388bn, cybercrime is more than 100 times the annual expenditure of UNICEF ($3.65 billion) ii

Over the past year
in 24 countries ...

431m / year

431m adults experienced cybercrime

1m+ / day

More than a million became victims every day

14 / second

14 adults suffered from cybercrime every second

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Summary: Most at Risk

MOST AT RISK

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Cybercrime's Most Common Victims

69%

of adults surveyed have experienced cybercrime in their lifetime, of whom 65% have suffered in the past 12 months

80%

of adults in emerging markets have been victims, compared to 64% in developed marketsiii

79%

of high level Internet users (49hrs/wk) have been victims, compared to 64% of adults online 1-24 hrs/wk

75%

of millennials aged 18-31 have been victims, compared to 61% of baby boomersiv

 

72%

of males online have been victims, compared to 65% of female adults

COMPUTER VIRUSES AND MALWARE ATTACKS

PREVENTABLE YET MORE PREVALENT

41%

4 in 10 adults surveyed do not have an up-to-date security software suite to protect their personal information online

54%

54% of online adults have experienced viruses or malware on their computers +

The Norton Cybercrime Report 2011

The Norton Cybercrime Report 2011 reveals for the very first time that:

10% of all adults surveyed have experienced cybercrime on their mobile device

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Summary: Can't Live Without It - Conclusion

Online & Offline Crime

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UNDERESTIMATING THE REAL THREAT OF CYBERCRIME

Cybercrime is far more rampant than people seem to realize

The Norton Cybercrime Report 2011 uncovers that:

x3

Three times more adults surveyed suffered cybercrime than offline crime

over the past 12 months (44% online cf. 15% offline) +

3 / 10

However, only 3 in 10 respondents (31%) thought they were more likely to be a victim of cybercrime than a crime in the physical world - e.g. burglary - over the next twelve months

Biggest ever cybercrime survey +

24 countries
19,636 interviews
12,704 adults
4,553 children
2,379 teachers

CAN'T LIVE WITHOUT THE INTERNET

1/4

24% of online adults globally "can't live without the Internet"

4/10

41% say they "need the Internet in their everyday life"

1/3

32% of social network users think they would "lose contact with friends" if they had to live without social networks

IN BRIEF...

This report reveals the huge extent of cybercrime and its shocking cost to consumers in terms of cash and lost time.

High level Internet users as well as online users who are young, male or from emerging markets have emerged as the most likely victims of online crime.

Inadequate security software exposes people unnecessarily to the dangers of computer viruses and malware.

With many failing to do the single easiest thing to prevent cyberattacks – i.e. install a full security suite - adults globally are going online, for considerable amounts of time, unprotected against the most common types of cybercrime.

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THEME 1: Shocking Scale: Number of Victims

Shocking Scale: Number of Victims

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1 MLLON+

VICTIMS A DAY

Every day there are twice as many
cybercrime victims as new born babies +

50,000 820 14
Victims every hour + Victims every minute Victims every second
hr
min
sec

65%

Among all cybercrime victims surveyed, nearly two thirds have fallen prey in the past 12 months alone - a total of 431m adults in 24 countries

69%

69% of adults have experienced cybercrime in their lifetime. Compared to the 2010 survey, there has been a 3% rise in overall cybercrime +

7/10

589 million

Cybercrime has affected 589m people in just 24 countries - equivalent to 9% of the entire population of the world vi

347m
431m
400m

431million

The total number of cybercrime victims in the past 12 months is greater than the entire populations of USA & Canada (347m vii ) or Western Europe (400m viii)

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THEME 1: Top 3 Cybercrimes

Top 3 Cybercrimes

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CYBERCRIME

Glbally
the most common – and most preventable - type of
cybercrime remains computer viruses or malware

54% of online adults have experienced virus/malware attacks

58% of these victims were attacked in the past 12 months

Mexico Brazil China South Africa

MEXICO

BRAZIL & CHINA

SOUTH AFRICA

GLOBALLY

Computer virus and malware crime capitals

71%
68%
65%
54%

Scams

11%

Online scams
are the second most common cybercrime +

10%

Phishing comes in a close third, catching out 10% of online adults +

For the first time, the Norton Cybercrime Report 2011 reveals that:

10%

10% of online adults have experienced cybercrime on their mobile phone.

This figure includes the emerging phenomenon of smishing (i.e. phishing by SMS)

A fake download came up and automatically I knew somebody or something had gotten into my laptop. There were four rogue viruses and a huge Trojan virus.

Somehow they got all of my bank account information and all of my email and passwords.

Everything was wiped out. There was money missing out of my primary bank account. They accessed one of my credit card accounts. They changed all the information on both of my emails and all my social networking accounts - I couldn’t access anything.

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THEME 1: The Total Cybercrime Bill

TOTAL BILL FOR
CYBERCRIME

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$388
Billion

The total bill for cybercrime footed by online adults in 24 countries topped USD $388bn over the past year

Victims valued the time they lost to cyber­crime at over $274bn
$114bn

The direct cash costs of cybercrime - money stolen by cyberthugs/spent on resolving cyberattacks - totalled $114bn

AS BIG A CRIME AS...

$288bn

The illegal trade in Marijuana, Cocaine & Heroin

$411bn

The entire illegal drugs trade ix

BETTER WAYS TO SPEND $388BN…

100

TIMES MORE CARE FOR KIDS - The 2011 bill for cybercrime is more than 100 times the global annual expenditure of UNICEF ($3.65bn) x

90

YEARS FIGHTING MALARIA $388bn would plug the annual funding gap to fight malaria for the next 90 years xi

38

YEARS DOUBLING EDUCATION - $10bn a year would be enough to double university education in sub-Saharan Africa xii

Roll Back Malaria requires over $5bn/year to tackle malaria. It receives just $1.6bn/year in funding.

Annual Cash Cost of Cybercrime

$113,
882,
054,
117

IN CASH

Cybercrime cost online adults in 24 countries a total of $114bn in cash in 12 months +

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THEME 1: The Cost of Time Lost

Annual Time Cost of Cybercrime

$274,
314,
758,
291

IN LOST TIME

The total loss of time for victims in 24 countries over the past 12 months can be valued at $274billion +

Time and Money Lost to Cybercrime

$114 Billion

Cybercrime cost in cash in 12 months

$274 Billion

Total loss of time for victims in 24 countries over the past 12 months

Extrapolated costs over the last 12 months – see methodology for more details. All figures are rounded

TIME IS MONEY…

4in10

39% of victims cited time lost as their ‘biggest hassle’ +

10DAYS

In the past 12 months, victims spent 10 days on average trying to satisfactorily resolve cyberattacks

4to16

UK and New Zealand victims solved their issues quickest (4 days). Victims in the UAE fared the worst (16 days)

I clicked on something on my computer and a lot of pictures came out and I got charged $200.

My computer went down after that and I had to pay to get it repaired and get all this antivirus stuff.

It took me so many months. So I got very upset.

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THEME 1: The Cost of Cyberapathy

The Cost of Cyberapathy

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Globally 41%
of adults do not have an up-to-date security software suite to protect their personal information online and the number of respondents with up-to-date security software has dropped 9% in 12 months +

Despite the huge costs of cybercrime, many people are not investing in adequate security software that protects against computer viruses and other preventable cycbercrimes

{*
LESS SAFE…

73%

NEARLY THREE QUARTERS OF FREE AV SOFTWARE USERS HAVE EXPERIENCED CYBERCRIME +

60%

6 in 10 FREE AV SOFTWARE USERS HAVE SUFFERED FROM COMPUTER VIRUSES/MALWARE +

MORE SORRY…
25%

A QUARTER OF ADULTS ARE PUTTING THEMSELVES AT RISK BY RELYING SOLELY ON FREE AV SOFTWARE

*}

Overall, 69% of online adults have experienced cybercrime and 54% have had a virus or malware appear on their computer

87%

Nearly 9 in 10 adults say it’s important their security software protects their computer 100% of the time, yet only a fifth (21%) who’ve installed security software feel it protects them from cybercrime 100% of the time.

DIAGNOSING THE DISCONNECT

This shows an emotional disconnect between what people think is important and what they’re actually doing to protect themselves against cybercrime. Often, because people feel the Internet is too complicated and the threats are unknown or ambiguous, they default to a learned helplessness where they simply accept cybercrime as part of the cost of going online.

Also, they cannot visualize online protection like they can with offline security systems like a fence or alarm that act as a physical deterrent.

Good online security is like having a professional bodyguard. Discreetly in the background, but there to spot all signs of danger and ready to step in to protect you against the attacks you expect and those you were never aware of.

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THEME 2: Most at Risk

Most Common Victims of Cybercrime

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69%

of adults surveyed have experienced cybercrime in their lifetime, of whom 65% have suffered in the past 12 months xiii

80%

of adults in emerging markets have been victims, compared to 64% in developed markets xiv

79%

of high level Internet users (49hrs/wk+) have been victims, compared to 64% of adults online 1-24 hrs/wk

75%

of millennials aged 18-31 have been victims, compared to 61% of baby boomers xv

 

72%

of males online have been victims, compared to 65% of female adults

Cybercrime Hotspots

Adults(%) who have been a victim of cybercrime

China 85%
South Africa 84%
Mexico 83%
Singapore, India, Brazil 80%
Hong Kong 77%
Poland, Germany 76%
USA, Switzerland 73%
UAE, New Zealand, Australia 72%
Spain, Canada 69%
Italy 68%
Sweden, France 60%
Denmark 57%
UK 51%
Belgium 50%
Netherlands 41%
Japan 38%

ONLINE/OFFLINE PARALLELS

These latest cybercrime statistics reflect crime rates in the physical world, where young adults and men are more often victims of crime.

Countries like South Africa and Brazil, where physical crimes against people are among the highest in the world, are clearly emerging as cybercrime capitals, too.

The results also show that geography and language are no barrier to cybercriminals, who we know are based in a diverse number of malicious host countries.

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THEME 2: High Level Usage = High Risk

HIGH LEVEL INTERNET USERS SUFFER MOST

79%

of people who spend 49+hrs/week online have been victims of cybercrime

ODDS ARE STACKED AGAINST USERS

The odds an airplane passenger will be involved in a plane crash in a year xvi

1/10.7m
75%

of people who spend 25-48hrs/week online have been victims of cybercrime

The odds a person will die in a transport accident in a year xvii

1/6,279
64%

of people who spend 1-24hrs/week online have been victims of cybercrime

The odds an online consumer will become a victim of cybercrime in a year xviii

1/2.27

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THEME 2: Most at risk: victims’ habits and attitudes

RISKY ONLINE HABITS

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RISKY ONLINE HABITS HEIGHTEN CYBERCRIME LEVELS

Over four fifths of cybercrime victims (84%) accept that
‘cybercrime is a risk everyone takes when they access the Internet’ +

RISKY ONLINE HABITS HEIGHTEN CYBERCRIME LEVELS

80%

viewing adult content

8 in 10 (80%) who view adult content online have experienced cybercrime

vs.

67%

67% who do not view adult content

78%

lying online

Nearly 8 in 10 people who have lied about their personal details online have experienced cybercrime

vs.

59%

59% who don’t lie online

77%

using free wifi

Over three quarters of those who use free Wifi have experienced cybercrime

vs.

62%

62% who don’t use free wifi

THE RISK YOU TAKE

I used to play poker online. Just small bets, but a lot of them. I noticed some times when I didn't think I'd played and got emailed by 'other players', which I didn't think was possible. One day I was in Jamaica and got contacted by the credit card company saying someone was trying to use my card in California. It turned out to be the person who emailed from the poker site.

The credit card and website refused to reimburse all my losses saying it was the risk you take when you sign up to these websites.

MILLENNIALS TAKE THE BIGGER GAMBLE

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Boomers + Millennials +
21 28
Hours online per week
48% 77%
spend time social networking
61% 75%
victim of cybercrime

HUGE CONCERN

Millennials typically don’t like paying for stuff online, but as they spend more and more time online, they need to be more aware of the dangers and face the fact that their risk of cybercrime increases the more they rely on free software.

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THEME 2: Most At Risk: Men

PREDICTABLE BEHAVIOUR?

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25hours

Men spend more hours a week on the Internet and spend more time communicating with strangers +

4x

Nearly four times as many men as women view adult content online +

2x

Twice as many men gamble online +

2x

Twice as many men date online

+

UNFORESEEN CYBERCRIME?

Men are more likely to be a victim
of cybercrime than women:

72%

More than 7 in 10 men have experienced cybercrime

65%

Less than two thirds of women have experienced cybercrime

SOCIAL SHOPPER STEREOTYPE

Women are more likely than men to spend time online:

67%

communicating with friends
(62% men)

66%

social networking
(58% men) +

52%

shopping
(50% men)

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THEME 2: The Cost of Free Speech Online

THE COST OF FREE SPEECH ONLINE

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78%

The 2011 survey registered a 5%
rise in the number of online liars. xx
The bad news for liars + is that
they are more likely to
be a victim of cybercrime
(78% cf. 59%
who don’t lie)

51% of adults and 65% of millennials have lied about personal details online or adopted a fake identity

"FREE"

4/10

Nearly 4 out of 10 millennials (39%) and cybercrime victims (37%) think you have the right to say or do anything online and not have it used negatively against you.

However, both groups think their online reputation could negatively affect them in the offline/physical world (millennials 53%; cybercrime victims 47%)

Globally, a quarter of respondents (25%) said they have digital regrets. This year’s study noted a 4% increase in the number of victims living with online regrets xix

REPUTATION MANIPULATION

What many millennials in particular do not understand is how permanent online decisions can be.

When they try on fake identities, lie about personal details, or enhance their online persona to the point of being false, they put themselves in a position of vulnerability.

It is incredibly easy for strangers (and even friends) to manipulate this and affect their permanent offline reputation.

Why Lie?

19%

‘just for fun’

18%

‘to get out of an awkward situation’

14%

‘to present a better image of myself online’

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THEME 3: Online & Offline Crime: Myths and Realities

Attacked From
All Sides

2x

Cybercrime victims are twice as likely to have been a victim of crime in the physical world + than non-cybercrime victims +

MORE PREVALENT THAN PEOPLE REALIZE

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Nearly three times as many adults surveyed have experienced cybercrime over the past 12 months than a crime in the physical world +

However, only 3 in 10 adults (31%) thought they were more likely to become a victim of online, rather than offline crime, in the next twelve months

Over the past 12 months:

15%

of adults surveyed have suffered a crime in the physical world

44%

of respondents have experienced cybercrime

CYBERDAREDEVILS

Some people tend to believe bad things won’t ever happen to them. So, they are willing to accept an unhealthy amount of risk, both online and offline.

In contrast to these ‘cyberdaredevils’, there are other personality types that lend themselves to victimisation. These people lack empowerment skills, online and offline, and could benefit greatly from crime prevention education and enhanced security systems.

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THEME 3: Online & Offline Crime: Equal Angst and Anger

EQUAL ANGST AND ANGER

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Among people who have experienced both online and offline crime

Just as Angry

68%

said the experience of cybercrime made them feel just as angry as crime in the physical world. Victims in China have the strongest emotional reactions +

“When my card got declined I was annoyed because I couldn’t understand why. Once I knew, I felt kind of stupid for not realizing that it wasn’t my antivirus company that I let scan my computer.” Victim, USA

Just as Upsetting

67%

said they found cybercrime just as upsetting as crime in the physical world

“I felt taken advantage of, I felt violated and I felt extremely vulnerable. I was crying because I didn’t know what was going to happen with the information they had.” Victim, USA

Cyberemotions

The experience of cybercrime; the sense of personal violation, and the range of emotions experienced are very similar to those of victims of robbery or physical assault.

It is completely normal for victims to blame themselves, but often that is self-defeating and leads to recurring victimization, unless it is accompanied by actions that empower the person.

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THEME 3: Online & Offline Crime: Cyberfear

SUFFERING IN SILENCE

I realized there’s no one else I can talk to. I screwed up really bad. I was really hesitant to talk to anybody because I was really embarrassed.

GETTING AWAY WITH IT

More criminals that were involved in traditional crimes are moving towards the Internet. They know that it’s easier, more profitable and the probability of being caught is lower.

Feeling less safe

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3/4

Three quarters of adults (74%) say that the possibility of cybercrime is something they are always aware of when online

35%

The number of people who feel safe online has dropped by 4% since the 2010 survey. xxi Globally, over a third of adults (35%) do not feel safe online from cybercrime attacks. This rises to:

53% of Brazilian adults

50% of French adults

54% of Italian adults

88% of Japanese adults

TAKING LITTLE ACTION

2/10

Only 21% of victims reported cybercrime to the police

6/10

59% of victims who’d suffered both online and offline crime felt there were fewer ways to get help after the cybercrime

9/10

89% of all respondents agree that more needs to be done to bring cybercriminals to justice

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THEME 4: Can't Live Without The Internet: Need To Be Online

NEED TO BE ONLINE

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1/4

24% of adults say they can’t live without the Internet

SOCIAL NETWORK NEEDS

1/3

32% of social network users think they would lose contact with friends if they had to live without their social networks

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday

2/5 41% SAY THEY NEED THE INTERNET IN THEIR EVERYDAY LIFE

Medically…

Medically, it’s possible to survive up to 10 days without water and up to 4 weeks without food

Yet many people say they couldn’t live without the Internet xxii xxiii

SOCIAL NETWORK USERS

Social network users who would lose contact with friends +:

40% USA

42% UAE

44% BRAZIL

47% CHINA / INDIA

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THEME 4: Can't Live Without It: Mobile Future

Increasingly Mobile Future

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FOR INTERNET ACCESS AND CYBERCRIME


44 % OF MOBILE PHONE OWNERS GLOBALLY USE THEIR MOBILE PHONE TO ACCESS THE INTERNET

RISING TO MORE THAN HALF OF ADULTS IN EMERGING MARKETS + AND NEARLY 6 IN 10 MILLENNIALS +

GLOBALLY
10 %

OF ONLINE ADULTS HAVE EXPERIENCED MOBILE-RELATED CYBERCRIME + AND MORE MOBILE-RELATED CYBERCRIME OCCURS IN COUNTRIES WHERE MORE PEOPLE ACCESS THE INTERNET VIA A MOBILE DEVICE

GLOBAL AVERAGE:
44% (ACCESS INTERNET VIA MOBILE DEVICE)
10% (EXPERIENCED MOBILE-RELATED CYBERCRIME)
=ACCESS INTERNET
VIA MOBILE DEVICE
=EXPERIENCED MOBILE-
RELATED CYBERCRIME
59%
17%
74%
31%
69%
20%
58%
17%
56%
20%
70%
16%

MOBILE INSECURITY

Whilst most people are currently most worried about cybercrime on their PC and laptop, (39% and 36% respectively) 13% of adults overall and 18% in emerging markets are most concerned about cybercrime attacks on their mobile phone (Among adults who own 2+ devices one of which is a PC, laptop or a mobile phone)

Despite the emergence of mobile cybercrime and its associated worries, among people accessing the Internet on their mobile, only:

13%

have an app to wipe personal data if their phone is lost

15%

use a security app to check the safety of files and websites

16%

have installed the most up-to-date mobile security

COMPUTERIZED WALLETS

Two things worry me. Mobile applications and crimes committed from or against mobile phones.

As smartphones grow we are going to basically have computerized wallets and I would see that as being both a target and means of attack.

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Concluding Thoughts

CONCLUDING THOUGHTS

$388 x 1 Billion

The costs of cybercrime are criminal: $388bn lost in just 12 months. While much of the world is in recession, cybercrime bucks the trend as a growth industry.

1 Million EMERGING VICTIMS

1m+ adults become cybercrime victims every day. The risks are high for all, with 44% of all online adults experiencing cybercrime in the last year. However, millennial males and online adults in emerging markets have emerged as the most likely victims.

MORE SAFE, LESS SORRY

As the Internet becomes more integral to daily life and we spend considerable time - 24hrs/week - online, we appear to be too accepting of the risks and doing too little to keep the cyberthugs at bay.

It's time all of us, and users in emerging markets, men and young people in particular, started being more safe and less sorry online.

FUTURE TRENDS

This is just the tip of the iceberg: the growth in access to the Internet over mobile devices in many more countries, coupled with a lack of protection for personal data, is likely to lead to a corresponding global rise in cybercrime via mobile devices in years to come.

DON'T GET ANGRY, GET NORTON

Cybercrime makes victims feel just as angry and upset as crime in the physical world and yet people are not taking adequate precautions. Over half of online adults have experienced computer viruses or malware, which can be easily prevented by installing a full software security suite.

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Norton Online Family Report

LIFE ONLINE AGED 8-17

What is life online really like for 8-17 year olds? And what is the impact on parents and teachers?

This annual Norton report has been expanded to 24 countries and provides new insights into technology’s positive opportunities and occasional pitfalls for kids – and their parents - globally.

We track the trends in kids’ online experiences and uncover some surprising findings about their shopping habits.

A brand new survey among teachers is an education in itself.

SURPRISING FINDINGS

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33%

A third of children globally are shopping online, 24% of whom sometimes shop without parental knowledge +

87%

Nearly 9 in 10 parents whose kids have experienced something negative online have become a victim of cybercrime themselves +
A fifth of teachers have personally experienced or know another teacher who’s experienced cyberbaiting +

82%

Four fifths of kids who’ve broken Internet house rules experienced something negative online +

360° GLOBAL INSIGHTS +

24 COUNTRIES
9,888 INTERVIEWS
2,956 PARENTS
4,553 KIDS
2,379 TEACHERS

ENCOURAGING TRENDS

74%

2009
Three quarters of parents agreed they knew what their kids did online

+

95%

2010-2011
Over 9 in 10 parents know what their kids look at online

+

62%

2010
62% of kids experienced something negative online

58%

2011
58% of kids experienced something negative online

+

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Shopping Schoolkids

SCHOOL KIDS' SHOPPING HABITS

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Our study reveals that twice as many kids are shopping online as parents realize. However, parents seem pretty aware of what kids are buying...
WHAT PARENTS THINK KIDS DO WHAT KIDS SAY THEY DO
17% 33%
shop online
40% 37%
buy music online
34% 30%
buy age-appropriate video games
32% 28%
buy tickets (e.g. concerts/cinema)
24% 25%
download apps
16% 13%
buy video game for older players
9% 6%
buy movies unsuitable for their age

$1,500?!...

At first, my daughter and I downloaded apps and music together for her iPhone and iPad. Then I gave her permission to do it herself, using my card. After 3 months I got a call saying she’d run up a bill of $1,500 dollars.

We sat down and had a good talk about it. She didn’t do it maliciously or on purpose. They seemed like such small single purchases, but it all quickly adds up.

We’ve solved it now, but it was a parenting problem I never expected to face.

KIDS & YOUR CREDIT CARD

46%

Nearly half of parents whose kids shop online allow their child to use their debit/credit card

+

30%

Nearly a third of parents who let their child use their debit/credit card to shop online say their child has used it without permission

+

23%

Nearly a quarter of parents who allow their child to use their debit/credit card to shop online say their child has overspent on it

+

Safe Shopping

As well as setting clear budgets, parents should also emphasize the importance of shopping on safe, reputable sites.

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Parental Blindspots

PARENTAL BLINDSPOTS

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12 %
Over 1 in 10 kids admit to visiting adult content sites when their parents are not around
17 %
Globally, only 6% of parents say they have no idea what their children do online. But three times as many children (17%) think their parents have no idea what they do online
23 %
Nearly a quarter of parents suspect their child changes the way they act online when they are watching them
40 %
4 in 10 kids say they sometimes stop what they are doing online if a parent is watching
PARENTS WHO KNOW WHAT THEIR CHILDREN LOOK AT ONLINE +

AVOIDING PARENTAL BLINDSPOTS

Parents need to be aware that kids are going to want privacy as they develop their own online identity, but they should also talk to them about the dangers of visiting inappropriate sites and sharing personal thoughts and information online.

Open Dialogue

Parents must keep dialogue open in the house, gently and warmly reminding children that if they experience something negative online there will be no punishment or negative judgment.

Kids who feel their parents will openly and honestly help them are more likely to go to them in a crisis.

Telling Mum & Dad about Negative Online Experiences

82%

Over 8 in 10 kids told a parent when they downloaded a virus

+

WHY KIDS WOULD KEEP QUIET

20%

2 in 10 kids wouldn't tell their parents about negative online experiences for fear they will get into trouble

19%

Nearly a fifth worry their parents would over-react

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Cyber-Schools

INTEGRATING TECHNOLOGY

91%

teachers

84%

kids

83%

parents

The vast majority of teachers, kids and parents believe schools should integrate Internet technology as much as possible +

Time Online

1/2

Over half (57%) of teachers think students spend the right amount of time online at school

1/4

Over a quarter (27%) of teachers think students do not spend enough time online at school

SOCIAL NETWORKING SHORTCOMINGS

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34%
A THIRD OF TEACHERS ARE FRIENDS WITH STUDENTS ON SOCIAL NETWORKING SITES
67%
HOWEVER, TWO THIRDS OF TEACHERS SAY BEING FRIENDS WITH STUDENTS ON SOCIAL NETWORKING SITES EXPOSES THEM TO RISKS +

CYBERSAFETY IN SCHOOLS

51%
Only half of teachers said their school has a code of conduct for how teachers and students could communicate with each other through social media
24%
Globally, a quarter of teachers said their school has no formal Internet safety policy+
12%
Over 1 in 10 teachers doesn’t know if their school has a formal internet safety curriculum

MORE NEEDED

44%
Nearly half of kids think they get too little education at school about online safety
70%
7 in 10 parents agree their child’s school should be doing more to educate children about online safety+
80%
Four fifths of teachers agree more online safety education is needed in schools+

CYBERBAITING SHOCK

1/5

21% of teachers said they had personally experienced or know another teacher who has experienced ‘cyberbaiting’

Cyberbaiting is when students irritate or ‘bait’ a teacher until the teacher gets so frustrated they yell or have a breakdown. Students are ready for the teacher to crack and film the incident on cell phones so they can later post the footage online, causing further shame or trouble for the teacher or school.

Teachers Need Support

It’s interesting that 60% of parents surveyed felt kids spend too much time online, yet some teachers seek more time online in school.

Teachers want to use technology and social networks to engage students, teach good digital citizenship and adapt material in new and exciting ways. Their problem is leveraging the positive aspects while avoiding the dangers.

This is a hot issue and some services have responded positively with guidelines for teachers. But school policy has often not caught up.

Schools should set standards for teachers on the best way to adapt technology in the classroom.

7

Digital Headlice

BRINGING HOME CYBER-BUGS & THUGS

Thanks to their kids, parents are a high risk group of Internet users

9/10

87% of parents whose kids have experienced something negative online have been victims of cybercrime themselves

+

3/4

72% of all parents have been victims of cybercrime

+

Digital Headlice

Cybercrime is like ‘digital head lice’ brought home by your kids to infect the home and upset them. As with any pest, you’ve got to protect your kids and get rid of it before it spreads and contaminates the whole household.

CHILDREN'S NEGATIVE ONLINE EXPERIENCES

Play Animation
Play Again
GLBALLY
62% OF KIDS GLOBALLY HAVE EXPERIENCED A NEGATIVE ONLINE SITUATION
39%
HAVE HAD A SERIOUS NEGATIVE ONLINE EXPERIENCE
13%
HAVE HAD A NEGATIVE MOBILE EXPERIENCE
EMERGING MARKETS
+
DEVELOPED MARKETS
76%
Three quarters of kids have had a negative online experience
57%
Over half of kids have had a negative online experience
56%
Over half have suffered a serious negative online experience
33%
A third have suffered a serious negative online situation
20%
2 in 10 kids have had a negative mobile experience
10%
1 in 10 kids has had a negative mobile experience
Twice as many kids who use social networking have experienced a negative online situation +
TOP 3 NEGATIVE EXPERIENCES
29%
A child/teenager I don’t know tried to befriend me on a social network
+
28%
I have seen violent images, videos or games online
25%
I downloaded a virus to my/my family’s computer

Parent's Big Fears About Their Kids Online

47%

Fear their kids will give out too much personal information to strangers

44%

Fear their kids are interacting with inappropriate people

44%

Fear their kids will be exposed to indecent information

Online Flu

While many parents understandably worry about the serious dangers of children giving out too much information to strangers, it’s important they also pay attention to experiences that are less serious, but more prevalent, such as downloading a virus.

Online viruses change, mutate and increase in intensity - much like a flu - requiring constant protection to fight off the threat of infection.

GOOD NEWS!

In the 14 tracking countries, there have been a few very small, but encouraging, declines in the number of children experiencing a negative online situation.

Children %
62%
2010
58%
2011
33%
2010
23%
2011
Negative online experiences (net)
Downloaded a virus

7

House Rules Rule

ONLINE MORE. MORE AT RISK

Mirroring the results among adults, the children’s survey shows that kids who spend more time online suffer more negative situations

88%

49+HRS/WEEK ONLINE - 88% OF KIDS WHO SPEND 49+HOURS A WEEK ONLINE HAVE HAD A NEGATIVE ONLINE EXPERIENCE

76%

25-48HRS/WEEK ONLINE - 76% OF KIDS WHO SPEND 25-48 HOURS A WEEK ONLINE HAVE HAD A NEGATIVE ONLINE EXPERIENCE

60%

1-24HRS/WEEK ONLINE - 60% OF KIDS WHO SPEND 1-24 HOURS A WEEK ONLINE HAVE HAD A NEGATIVE ONLINE EXPERIENCE

RULE BREAKERS BEWARE!

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52%
Just over half of kids who follow house rules have had a negative online experience
77%
Over three quarters of parents have rules for their kids’ use of the Internet
82%
Four fifths of Internet house rule breakers have suffered a negative online experience
HOUSE RULES
51%
TIME
Only half of parents have house rules about how much time their kids can spend online
43%
SAFE SITES
Less than half of parents have house rules about safe websites
32%
PARENTAL CONTROLS
Under a third of parents have set parental controls on the family computer

TALKING & SNOOPING

2/3

63% of parents talk to their kids about online safety

1/3

34% of parents have checked their kid’s online usage or browser history without their knowledge

1/4

25% of parents have secretly checked their kid’s social network site

Do Better

Families should make sure their House Rules include guidelines on:

  • online friends
  • time limits
  • safe websites
  • downloads and
  • online purchases

And as well as setting parental controls, families should have a safe-site browser tool and make sure that youngsters understand how this works and why it’s important.

Parents should explain how accidental clicks and spam can lead to unpleasant surprises and inappropriate sites.

Having software and virus protection can help against accidental inappropriate behavior.

8

Concluding Thoughts

CONCLUDING THOUGHTS

POSITIVE & SURPRISING FINDINGS

Norton’s on-going study into children’s lives online shows that parents are becoming more aware of what their children are doing on the Internet, while the new questions pinpoint some emerging issues that parents need to pay attention to – most notably unauthorized online shopping by their kids.

While it’s positive to see children’s negative online experiences are decreasing in tracked countries, we have to remember all the levels are still unacceptably high.

What is surprising is the way parents – and particularly those with children who’ve experienced something negative online - are at increased risk of cybercrime themselves.

WHAT PARENTS CAN DO

Although it’s not at the top of parents’ list of concern, the incidence of computer viruses and malware is an area where parents can easily stamp out one of the most prevalent online threats to their children.
Behavior and conversation play important roles too. Internet house rules are amazingly effective at minimizing risks. Keeping dialogue open is crucial to help resolve issues, should they arise.

CYBER-SCHOOLS

It’s concerning that teachers are suffering negative experiences such as cyberbaiting, but it’s encouraging to see so many are in favor of technology in education.

FUTURE TRENDS

The initial insights into mobile Internet and the issues related to it highlight the future trends we need to keep track of.

9

Methodology & Definitions

METHODOLOGY

STRATEGYONE CONDUCTED AN ONLINE SURVEY AMONG:

  • 12,704 ADULTS (including 2956 parents)

  • 4553 CHILDREN (aged 8 – 17)

  • 2379 TEACHERS (of students aged 8 – 17)

  • TOTAL NUMBER OF INTERVIEWS: 19,636

The survey was conducted in 24 countries (14 tracking countries: Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, New Zealand, Spain, Sweden, United Kingdom, United States; 10 new countries: Belgium, Denmark, Holland, Hong Kong, Mexico, South Africa, Singapore, Poland, Switzerland and UAE).*

The survey was conducted in the primary language of each country.

Questions asked were identical across all countries, with some overlap between the adult/parent/teacher and youth surveys.

Interviews were conducted between 6th February 2011 – 14th March 2011.

  • The margin of error for the total sample of adults (n=12,704) is + 0.87% at the 95% level of confidence.

  • The margin of error for the total sample of parents, defined as parents with children aged 8-17 who spend 1+ hour online per month (n=2,956) is + 1.8% at the 95% level of confidence.

  • The margin of error for the total sample of children (n=4,553) is + 1.45% at the 95% level of confidence.

  • The margin of error for the total sample of teachers (n=2,379) is + 2.0.% at the 95% level of confidence.

Important notes:

The global data has been weighted to ensure all countries have equal representation. Adults to n500 (n100 parents), children to n200, teachers to n100.

* References to 2010 – 2011 data changes
is based upon the 14 tracking markets only: Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, New Zealand, Spain, Sweden, United Kingdom and the United States.

StrategyOne, international research agency.

QUOTES FROM VICTIMS/INTERNET USERS

The quotes from victims/Internet users are taken from four focus groups held in December 2010 / January 2011 (two in in New York on December 15th 2010 and two in LA on January 12th 2011)

  • Group 1 = US Baby Boomers group:
    Must have been born in the US between 1946-1964
    Mix of gender

  • Group 2 = Hispanic first generation Americans group:
    Fluent English speaking skills
    Mix of ages in group and gender (18-64 yrs)
    First generation American (lived in US 0-5 years)

  • Group 3 = US Millennial group:
    Must have been born in the US between 1980-1992
    Mix of gender

  • Group 4 = Asian first generation Americans group:
    Fluent English speaking skills
    Mix of ages in group and gender
    First generation American (lived in US 0-10 years)

EXTRAPOLATION CALCULATIONS

1) Over 431 million victims in 24 countries over past 12 months:
Online population from CIA factbook (24 country total = 802,872,752), latest research from NCR shows 69% of adults in 24 countries have been a victim of cybercrime ever and of these 65% have been a victim in the past 12 months.
Online population per country x % cybercrime ever per country x % cybercrime past 12 months per country = 431,504,885 (sum of 24 countries).

2) 14 cybercrime victims every second / 820 cybercrime victims every minute/ almost 50,000 per hour / over 1 million per day impacting over 431 million adults in the past year in 24 countries*
Victims over past 12 months (as above) 431,504,885 / 365 days per year / 24 hours / 60 minutes / 60 seconds.

3) Cybercrime is big business costing nearly $114 billion in the last year in 24 countries
Victims over past 12 months (per country) x average financial cost of cybercrime (per country in US currency). Figure shown in the sum of all countries total cost.

3a) The value of lost time over the past 12 months is $274 billion in 24 countries
Victims over past 12 months (per country) x average time cost of cybercrime (per country in US currency). Figure shown in the sum of all countries total cost.

4) The total number of cybercrime victims ever: 589 million
Online population per country x % cybercrime victims ever per country. Figure shown is the sum of all countries’ total cost.

5) Total cost of cybercrime:
Total financial cost $114 billion plus value attributed to lost time trying to resolve cybercrime $274 billion = $388 billion.

DEFINITIONS

“CYBERCRIME – ADULT SURVEY”
Throughout the report cybercrime is defined as: Ever experienced 1+ of the following:

  • Computer viruses or Malware appeared on my computer
  • I responded to a Phishing message thinking it was a legitimate request
  • Online Harrassment
  • Someone has hacked into my social networking profile and pretended to be me
  • I was approached online by sexual predators
  • I responded to online scams
  • I experienced online credit card fraud
  • I experienced Identity theft
  • I responded to a smishing message
  • I experienced another type of cybercrime on my cell / mobile phone
  • I experienced another type of cybercrime on my computer

“EMERGING MARKETS” (surveyed)
Brazil, India, China, Poland, Mexico, UAE, South Africa

“DEVELOPED MARKETS” (surveyed)
UK, USA, France, Germany, Italy, Australia, Canada, Sweden, Japan, Spain, New Zealand, Denmark, Netherlands, Belgium, Switzerland, Singapore, Hong Kong

“MILLENNIALS”
Young adults born 1980-1993

“BABY BOOMERS”
Adults born 1946-1964

“RESOLVING CYBERCRIME”
Victims were asked if they successfully resolved all of their cyber-attacks over the past year.

“FREE ANTI-VIRUS (AV) SOFTWARE USERS”
Net figure includes users of free AV software only plus users of a free/paid for combination of software

CHILDREN/KIDS
The terms ‘children’ or ‘kids’ as used in this report refer to children aged 8-17 only.

PARENTS
The term ‘parents’ as used in this report refers only to parents with children aged 8-17.

TEACHERS The term ‘teachers’ as used in this report refers only to teachers of children aged 8-17.

NEGATIVE ONLINE EXPERIENCES
All negative online experiences include one or more of the following:

  1. Been bullied online on a computer
  2. Been bullied via cell / mobile phone
  3. An adult I don’t know online tried to get me to meet them in the real world
  4. Another child or teenager I don’t know online tried to get me to meet them in the real world
  5. An adult tried to get me to do something online I thought was wrong
  6. Another child or teenager tried to get me to do something online I thought was wrong
  7. I responded to an online or email scam
  8. I responded to a Phishing message thinking it was a legitimate request
  9. I responded to a Smishing message (i.e. phishing via SMS)
  1. I downloaded a virus to my own or to my family computer
  2. I received sexually suggestive or nude images of someone I know on my cell / mobile phone [kids 12 – 17 only]
  3. I received sexually suggestive or nude images of someone I don’t know on my cell / mobile phone [kids 12 – 17 only]
  4. Someone has hacked into my social networking profile and pretended to be me
  5. An adult I don’t know tried to add me as a friend on a social networking site
  6. Another child or teenager I don’t know tried to add me as a friend on a social networking site
  7. I have seen very violent images, videos or games online
  8. I have seen nude body images or videos online
  9. I  have experienced other types of cybercrimes or negative online situations on my cell / mobile
  10. I have experienced other types of cybercrimes or negative online situations on my computer

SERIOUS NEGATIVE ONLINE EXPERIENCES Serious negative online experiences include:

  1. I downloaded a virus to my own or to my family computer
  2. Someone has hacked into my social networking profile and pretended to be me
  3. I responded to an online or email scam
  1. I responded to a Phishing message thinking it was a legitimate request
  2. I responded to a Smishing message (i.e. phishing by SMS)
  3. An adult I don't know online tried to get me to meet them in the real world
  4. An adult tried to get me to do something online I thought was wrong
  5. I received sexually suggestive or nude images of someone I know / mobile phone
  6. I received sexually suggestive or nude images of someone I don't know on my cell / mobile phone
  7. I have experienced other types of cybercrimes or negative online situations on my cell / mobile
  8. I have experienced other types of cybercrimes or negative online situations on my computer

NEGATIVE MOBILE EXPERIENCES Negative mobile experiences include:

  1. I have been bullied via cell / mobile phone
  2. I responded to a smishing (SMS phishing, or scam) message
  3. I received sexually suggestive or nude images of someone I knew on my cell / mobile phone
  1. I received sexually suggestive or nude images of someone I don’t know on my cell / mobile phone
  2. I  have experienced other types of cybercrimes or negative online situations on my cell / mobile

DEVELOPED MARKETS (surveyed)
UK, USA, France, Germany, Italy, Australia, Canada, Sweden, Japan, Spain, New Zealand, Denmark, Netherlands, Belgium, Switzerland, Singapore, Hong Kong

EMERGING MARKETS (surveyed)
Brazil, India, China, Poland, Mexico, UAE, South Africa

CYBERBAITING
By cyber-baiting we are referring to students irritating a teacher until the teacher gets so frustrated they yell or have a breakdown.  Students are ready for this ‘crack’ and have multiple students filming the incidents on cell / mobile phones so they can later post the incident on websites like YouTube to get the teacher or school in trouble or shame them.

CONTRIBUTORS

Expert insights, advice and tips have been provided by:

Joseph LaBrie, Phd
Loyola Marymount University
Associate Professor,Psychology;
Director, Heads UP

Adam Palmer
Norton Lead Cyber Security Advisor

Vanessa Van Petten
Author, Radical Parenting
CEO & Youthologist

Marian Merritt
Norton Internet Safety Advisor

9

References

REFERENCES

  1. Source: 2005 World Drug Report and 2011 World Drug Report
  2. Source: http://www.unicef.org
  3. Emerging markets net:
    Brazil, India, China, Poland, Mexico, UAE, South Africa.
    Developed markets net:
    UK, USA, France, Germany, Italy, Australia, Canada, Sweden, Japan, Spain, New Zealand, Denmark, Netherlands, Belgium, Switzerland, Singapore, Hong Kong.
  4. Millennials: born 1980-1993, Baby Boomers: born 1946-1964
  5. Source: http://wiki.answers.com/
  6. Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_population
  7. Source: http://www.census.gov/ipc/www/idb/rank.php
  8. Source: http://wiki.answers.com
  9. Source: www.havocscope.com
  10. Source: http://www.unicef.org Annual report of the Executive Director, Apr 2011
  11. Source: http://www.rollbackmalaria.org/keyfacts.html
  12. Source: http://www.arp.harvard.edu/AfricaHigherEducation/Economics2.html
  1. Base: All Adult victims of cybercrime 2010 N = 4601 / Base: All Adult victims of cybercrime 2011 14 TRACKING COUNTRIES N = 4771. N.B. ‘General feelings of stress, anger or embarrassment’ was asked in 2010 but not 2011
  2. Emerging markets:
    Brazil, India, China, Poland, Mexico, UAE, South Africa.
    Developed markets:
    UK, USA, France, Germany, Italy, Australia, Canada, Sweden, Japan, Spain, New Zealand, Denmark, Netherlands, Belgium, Switzerland, Singapore, Hong Kong.
  3. Millennials: born 1980-1993, Baby Boomers: born 1946-1964
  4. Source: www.bookofodds.com USA odds
  5. Source: www.bookofodds.com USA odds
  6. Source: Book of Odds calculator
  7. Base: All Adults 2010 N = 7066 / Base: All Adults 2011 14 TRACKING COUNTRIES N = 7000. 2010: 22% had online regrets. 2011: 26%
  8. Base: All Adults 2010 N = 7066 / Base: All Adults 2011 14 TRACKING COUNTRIES N = 7000 2010: 45% lied online. 2011: 50%
  9. Base: All Adults 2010 N = 7066 / Base: All Adults 2011 14 TRACKING COUNTRIES N = 7000. 2010: 66% Net ‘feel very safe’ + ‘feel somewhat safe’. 2011: 62% ‘feel safe’
  10. Source: http://www.survivaltopics.com/survival/how-long-can-you-survive-without-water
  11. Source: http://wiki.answers.com/Q/How_long_can_humans_survive_without_food_or_water